Thursday, 9 Dec 2021

How To Troubleshoot And Adjust The Idle On A Chainsaw

How To Troubleshoot And Adjust The Idle On A Chainsaw

The first thing you should do is listen to the Chainsaw as it idles.

If your Chainsaw is running roughly, if it shudders and vibrates, this could be a sign that the Carburetor needs adjustment.

On most models of Chain saw there will be a metal cap which you can unscrew with an adjustable wrench to find the Carburetor.

Let’s proceed under the assumption that after inspecting your Carburetor, adjusting screws, and screwing back in your metal cover you still have issues with your engine not performing properly.

This will be when you go out to observe your chainsaw as it started up and runs idle without cutting.

There are two major signs that it is time to adjust the Chain Saw’s Idle:

If the saw has a tendency to run away or chainsaw races at idle when started, this needs immediate attention.

Not only can you hurt yourself with this issue, but this could be indicative of serious problems within your engine if left unaddressed long term.

Adjusting the Carburetor will help regulate the speed at which fuel flows into your Chainsaw, and should aid in preventing your saw from getting too up-happy.

If your chainsaw idles fast then slows down after running for a few minutes, also consider adjusting your idle setting.

This means that when the carb is set correctly there will be less gas flow

The first way would be to make sure there is plenty of gas and oil in the machine.

Ensure the fuel tank needs to be refueled with its designated gasoline for optimal performance.

Turn on your chainsaw using the throttle trigger, allow it to heat up until the idle drops down near zero RPMs, then turn it off again letting it cool off for a minute or so.

Repeat this process three times before checking back with us for more support.

It may be necessary to let it continue to run until warm enough that there are no longer any RPM fluctuations at idle.

Another way to tell if your Chainsaw is in need of a service is by listening for unusual sounds from the machine.

If you hear popping, spattering, or knocking noises from either end of the motor–and especially from around the muffler–it may be time to schedule a service appointment with us as soon as possible.

This can be indicative that carbon deposits are clogging your machine despite regular use and care.

Chainsaws- power tool used by workers in logging plants when cutting down trees or transporting logs on sleighs along snowy terrain, ensure there is plenty of gas & oil in the machine, listen for unusual sounds from the machine.

Your logs don’t have much to say for themselves?

That’s alright!

We can offer you a little bit of help–just turn your Chainsaw on and allow it to heat up until the idle drops near zero RPMs.

Then, turn it back off again and let it cool off for a minute or so before checking back with us via email.

It may be necessary to continue running until the engine has been warmed up enough that there is no longer any RPM fluctuation at idle speed.

If you hear popping, spattering, or knocking noises from either end of the motor–and especially from around your muffler–that could be a sign that carbon deposits are clogging your machine.

It’s time to schedule a service appointment with us.